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Monday, 5 January 2015

Red Light Districts of Korea (NSFW!), Part III: Wanwol-dong, Busan Seo-gu - Busan Vacance and... some NASTY Jobs.





The lustful angel, Kwon Ojung enraged when Ai called his name as Kwon PISS.
(Note: Ojum-오줌 is pee/piss in Korean).
Busan is also the birthplace of South Korea's sex industry, where Japanese troops built the first brothels after invading the country in 1904. But the selling of Korean women goes back to the 15th century, when wealthy men bought educated Kisaeng girls to live in their homes and entertain them with song, dance, cooking and sometimes sex.

Today, sex work accounts for 4 percent of the country's gross domestic product, according to government reports. Prostitution brings $21 billion a year -- more than electricity and gas combined. There are an estimated 330,000 sex workers, 80,000 brothels and 69 red-light districts in a country the size of Indiana.

Busan is infamous for Wanwol-dong (Hanja: 琓月洞) which is located at Busan Seo-gu, a maze of dark alleys where women are on display in row upon row of "glass houses." A peculiar Korean invention, a glass house is about the size of a parking space, with glass walls on three sides and a mirrored back wall concealing a private bedroom. Women sit on chairs or chaises or on the floor inside, illuminated by red lights that cast a pink glow.

According to the History of Busan Seo-gu's Administrative Divisions, Wanwol-dong precinct divided into two subprecincts which are called Wanwol-dong 1-ga and Wanwol-dong 2-ga. In May 1st 1982, Wanwol-dong 1~2-ga changed their precinct names into Chungmu-dong 2~3-ga and subsequently absorbed into Chungmu-dong Precinct.

For about $75, men strolling or driving by have their pick of older women in silk bathrobes, younger women in hot pants and even preteens in ballerina skirts and heart-shaped bodices.

Glass houses are just one item on South Korea's sexual menu. Sex is sold out of bars, restaurants, coffee shops, barbershops, tearooms, karaoke bars, saunas, massage parlors, over the Internet, in skin-care shops and hair salons, in computer rooms called PC bangs, in "love motels" and in nightclubs near U.S. military bases.

Even something as simple as ordering coffee has been sexualized. "Ticket tabang" girls make home deliveries with thermoses of coffee to sex-seeking callers.

While a 2004 South Korean law targeting pimps and buyers has slowed foot traffic in the open-air sex markets, early signs indicate that the crackdown has had the unintended effect of fueling international sex trafficking. Pimps simply go online or overseas -- mainly to Australia and the United States -- where demand is high and risk is low. They recruit in cities like Seoul and Busan, where most of the country's universities are located.

Busan police, meanwhile, have announced it will crack down on the Wanwol-dong red-light district. Unlike Seoul, however, Busan’s places of ill-repute apparently offer their services more on the sly, so they’ve order police to strengthen surveillance. This is to say, massage parlors and other entertainment establishments offering sexual services other than sexual intercourse (read: rub and tugs) will be targeted.

With police cracking down, pimps have started closing down their shops… at least for the time being. A police official in Busan said the crackdown on barber shops, massage parlors and other naughty places will continue.

Hardcore Full-Salon in Busan? You're bitchin' me, don't you?

Kim Dong-hyun: WHOA! That's pretty fucking good!