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This blog may contain not-so-strong languages and slightly strong ecchi pictures. Please proceed with caution.

Wednesday, 7 January 2015

Red Light Districts of Korea (NSFW!), Part VIII: Yeongdeungpo Red-Light District - Protect our Rice Pot, my fellow bitches!





Extract from Associated Press, July 6th 2011
"South Korean sex workers fight to protect brothels"

About 259,000 people, 70 percent of them male customers, have been arrested since the new laws took effect in 2004. Nearly 4,000 prostitutes have left their brothels, while 1,800 remain, and seven of the country's 35 major red-light districts have disappeared, according to police records.

Prostitutes and pimps say police have taken a new and aggressive approach in Seoul Yeongdeungpo-gu that has driven away most customers: stepped-up patrols, police cars parked visibly in the area and plainclothes officers watching with binoculars. Jang said police stormed the area three times in June alone, arresting three prostitutes and three customers.

"There hasn't been this kind of crackdown before," said Kang Hyun-joon, a former pimp who runs an association of prostitutes and pimps in South Korea.

Sex workers suspect the nearby Times Square department store pushed police to act against the brothels. Police and store officials deny the claim. The National Police Agency says officers are also clamping down on other districts as part of a routine nationwide crackdown.

One Yeongdeungpo police officer, speaking on condition of anonymity because of department rules, said police decided to shut down the brothels because residents increasingly voiced worry about young students passing through the area since the upscale department store opened in 2009.

It is not the first time South Korea's development boom has sparked friction in older neighborhoods.

In 2009, a police raid on a building occupied by squatters near another Seoul red-light district led to a blaze that killed six people. Protesters hurled Molotov cocktails at charging police commandos, causing the fire. The building was eventually demolished to make room for planned new high-rise buildings.

Brothel workers and other critics say police crackdowns have unfairly targeted traditional red-light zones, while overlooking other sex businesses thriving in the shadows.

Among those are "kiss rooms," where men can pay for sex, and one-room apartments offering sexual services. Men can also buy sex at barber shops, massage parlors and karaoke bars on almost all major streets and through online social networking sites.

South Korea runs nine support centers offering vocational training and psychological counseling to former prostitutes where they can work for a monthly salary of about $460 to $920, according to government officials.

Many women, however, find it hard to adjust to new lives and to resist the better pay of sex work. Despite the social stigma, they drop out of the centers and return to prostitution.






Kim Dong-hyun: Fire Egg? Oh yeah, that's an interesting name. I like it!