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This blog may contain not-so-strong languages and slightly strong ecchi pictures. Please proceed with caution.

Friday, 7 March 2014

Korea's NSFW, Part V: Prostitution in Korean Republic? You might be kidding me!

간통해서 (committing adultery) is supposed to be 관통해서 (passing by) and 강간 (raep) is supposed to be 관광 (tourism).
President Kim Young-sam's Outrageous Speech may tarnish the status of Jeju Island as UNESCO Triple Crown. That's why the Gyeongsang Dialect makes the formal speeches in Standard Korean fucked up.
Prostitution in South Korea a.k.a Republic of Korea is illegal, but according to The Korea Women's Development Institute, the sex trade in Korea was estimated to amount to 14 trillion South Korean won ($13 billion) in 2007, roughly 1.6 percent of the nation's gross domestic product.

The number of prostitutes dropped by 18 percent to 269,000 during the same period. The sex trade involved some 94 million transactions in 2007, down from 170 million in 2002. The amount of money traded for prostitution was over 14 trillion won, much less than 24 trillion won in 2002. Despite legal sanctions and police crackdowns, prostitution continues to flourish in South Korea, while sex workers continue to actively resist the state's activities.

Following the enactment of the Special Law in 2004, there was a crackdown on red-light districts; while many of the brothels in those areas were forced to close, the crackdown went as quickly as it came, with the result that prostitution was driven more underground but also became a more competitive business with lower prices and more services.

Red light districts in South Korea can compare to those of Amsterdam and Germany. The four main red light districts in South Korea prior to the Special Law are Cheongnyangni 588 (Dongdaemun-gu), Yongsan Station (Yongsan-gu), and Mia-dong (Gangbuk-gu) in Seoul and Jagalmadang in Daegu Metropole. While not all of them are operating to full capacity, some still exist while being tolerated not only due to the vast amount of money that is involved in the business, but also in an attempt to control the sex industry.

Other sexual services include 가택 마사지 (gataek massage) which is an "in-call" massage where the customer would travel or meet at the masseuse's home or quarters, 키스방 (kiss bang) which are rooms where customers pay to french kiss and fondle women, and 출장 마사지 (chuljang massage) or an "out-call" massage where the masseuse travels to the customer's place, love motel, hotel, or another disclosed location.

At least half of South Korea's 200,000 runaway youths, 60% of whom are female, have worked as underage prostitutes. The young girls, who often run away to escape academic pressure, sell sex over internet chat, and live with "families" in jjimjilbang, or bathhouses with fellow prostitutes. According to United Voice for Eradication of Prostitution, these teen prostitutes are sometimes raped, gang raped, or contract syphilis from their activities. Recidivism is common, with over half of the girls counseled by the Voice returning to the sex trade, because of blackmail from former pimps and social ostracism from future husbands and families.