Disclaimer

This blog may contain not-so-strong languages and slightly strong ecchi pictures. Please proceed with caution.

Thursday, 28 February 2013

Perrine's 2.28 Special: 2.28 Central Park, Gongpyeong-dong, Daegu Jung-gu

Perrine expressed dissatisfaction against President Syngman Rhee's Government. Wait. Syngman Rhee is died long ago.

Just a three minute walk from the Gukchae-bosang Memorial Park in Dongin-dong 2-ga, Daegu Jung-gu, you will find the 2.28 Central Memorial Park. This park was established to commemorate the student led demonstration of February 28th 1960. The students in Daegu Metropole and in many neighboring cities joined in demanding democracy, and the ousting of the dictatorship of President Syngman Rhee.

The memory of these fearless students is embodied in this park with a statue and fountain, showing the peace after their successful stand for democracy. You will find people of all ages in this park enjoying the shade from the trees during the spring and summer time and the beautiful lights at night providing romantic place for couples.

Wednesday, 20 February 2013

Yeonpyeongdo Bombardment in Gyeongin Year (2010)

As I expected, Chise is a devout Christian. She don't have any place in Northern Limit Line Korean Archipelago to fly. Sigh...

Yeonpyeong Island or Yeonpyeongdo (Hanja: 延坪島) is a group of South Korean islands in the Yellow Sea, located about 80 km (50 miles) west of Incheon Metropole and 12 km (7.5 miles) south of the coast of Southern Hwanghae Province, North Korea. The main island of the group is Daeyeonpyeongdo ("Big Yeonpyeong Island"), also referred to simply as Yeonpyeong Island, with an area of 7.01 km2 (2.71 sq mi) and a population of around 1,300.

The principal population centre is Yeonpyeong-ri, where the island's ferry port is located. The other inhabited island is Soyeonpyeongdo a.k.a Soyeonpyeong-ri ("Small Yeonpyeong Island") with a small population and an area of 0.24 km2 (0.093 sq miles). Several other small islands comprise the rest of the group.

The island group constitutes Yeonpyeong-myeon, one of the subdivisions of Ongjin County, Incheon Metropole, South Korea. Yeonpyeong Island is known for its crab fishery. The postal code for Yeonpyeong-myeon is 409-840 and constitutes with five villages:
  • 409-841: Nambu-ri and Seobu-ri
  • 409-842: Dongbu-ri, Jungbu-ri and Soyeonpyeong-ri

Yeonpyeong lies near the Northern Limit Line and is only 12 km (7.5 miles) from the North Korean coastline. The 1953 Armistice Agreement which ended the Korean War specified that the five islands including Yeonpyeong would remain under South Korean control. North Korea subsequently respected the UN-acknowledged western maritime border for many years until around the mid-1990s.

However, since the 1990s North Korea has disputed the western maritime border, called the Northern Limit Line (NLL). The North Korean government claims a border farther south that encompasses valuable fishing grounds (though it skirts around South Korean-held islands such as Yeonpyeong). North Korea's claim is not accepted internationally.

Looks very awful, Northern Commies sent 170 artillery shells to Yeonpyeongdo while the ROK stroke back with 80 shells. I think ROK will pay it tenfold against DPRK Commies.
On November 23, 2010, North Korean artillery shelled Yeonpyeong with dozens of rounds at Yeonpyeong-ri and the surrounding area. This shelling followed a Southern military exercise in the area. The South returned fire with 155mm K-9 self-propelled howitzers. The shelling damaged dozens of houses as well as Southern military infrastructure and set buildings on fire. Two South Korean Marines and two civilians were killed in the shelling, with eighteen others wounded.

Accounts of the billowing smoke were reported in Korean and international newspapers; and thick columns of black smoke rising from the island were the primary proof that the attack had occurred. South Koreans watching television saw the smoke rising from the island after it was hit.

This Effing Northern Commies Forces target these nine vital places, majorly in Daeyeonpyeong-do. Those rotten Northern Commie Kimchi Bastards, they will pay for this. 

Monday, 18 February 2013

Changuimun a.k.a Buksomun

Sanae's Sure Kill Technique: Twin Tail Attack will kill you any time. Watch out.
Changuimun (Hangul 창의문, Hanja 彰義門; also known as Northwest Gate) is one of the Eight Cardinal Gates of Seoul in the Fortress Wall of Seoul, South Korea, which surrounded the city in the Joseon Dynasty. The gate is also known as Buksomun (북소문/北小門, “North Small Gate”) and Jahamun (자하문/紫霞門).

Changuimun was originally built in 1396. Along with Hyehwamun (the Northeast Gate), Changuimun served as a major portal for those exiting the walled city of Seoul, then known as Hanyang (한양 , 漢陽) to travel north. (Sukjeongmun, the North Gate, had a largely ceremonious function.) The wooden gatehouse above Changuimun was burned down during the Imjin Invasion by Japan (1592-1598), but was rebuilt in 1740 or 1741. The gatehouse is currently the oldest gatehouse of those on the “Four Small Gates” (사소문) in the Fortress Wall of Seoul. The name Changuimun means literally “Showing the Correct Thing Gate.”

Changuimun is located in Cheongun-dong san 4-11 beonji, Seoul Jongno-gu. It can be accessed easily via taking Seoul Metro Line 1 to Station 131: Jonggak Station exit 3, then taking bus 7022 at Jeil Bank, and getting off at Jahamun Tunnel. Visitors to the gate today are allowed access to the front and the back of the gate, and under the gate itself. Visitors may also carefully view the wooden gatehouse above the gate, but are not allowed inside, and should not approach too closely due to a laser alarm system. If approaching the gate from the west, visitors notice there is a gate-like tunnel leading up to the gate itself.

The gate is known for being in a very early state of preservation, compared with the rest of the Eight Gates of Seoul.

The wooden rafters on the interior of the gate are decorated with chickens, which were known as enemies of the centipede. This is in contrast to Hyehwamun, whose rafters are decorated with the phoenix, enemies of small birds.

Very close to Changuimun are memorials to two people who lost their lives defending South Korea during the Blue House Raid on January 21, 1968: Superintendent General Choi Gyu-sik; and the Assistant Inspector Officer, Jung Jong-su.

Hyehwamun a.k.a Dongsomun

Hyehwamun is taken from Hyehwa-dong, Seoul Jongno-gu. Some Seoulites claim that gate is located at Seongbuk-dong 1-ga, Seoul Seongbuk-gu. I think Hyehwa-dong is the suitable place for this gate.
Hyehwamun (Hangul 혜화문, Hanja 惠化門; also known as Northeast Gate) is one of the Eight Cardinal Gates of Seoul in the Fortress Wall of Seoul, South Korea, which surrounded the city in the Joseon Dynasty. The gate is also known as Dongsomun (동소문/東小門, “East Small Gate”).

Hyehwamun was originally built in 1396, and was originally called Honghwamun (홍화문/弘化門). But this name came into conflict with the east gate of Changgyeong Palace, built in 1483. So in 1511, the name was changed to its current name. The gate’s wooden gatehouse, constructed either in 1684 or 1744, was brought down in 1928, leaving only the stone archway standing. Later in the Japanese colonial period (1910-1945), the entire gate was brought down to make room for a street car line linking Hyehwa-dong, Seoul Jongno-gu and Donam-dong, Seoul Seongbuk-gu. The gate was rebuilt in 1992, slightly further north than the site of the previous gate. The name Hyehwamun means literally "Distribution of Wisdom Gate." It is one of the Four Small Gates (사소문) in the Fortress Wall of Seoul.

Hyehwamun is located along a busy street (Dongsomunno, 동소문로). The gate is incorporated into the Fortress Wall to its north. Immediately to its south is the street, but then the Fortress Wall continues on the other side of the street, running all the way down to the East Gate, Heunginjimun. Visitors to the gate today are allowed access to the front and the back of the gate, and under the gate itself. Visitors may also carefully view the wooden gatehouse above the gate, but are not allowed inside, and should not approach too closely due to a laser alarm system.

The gate can be accessed via Seoul Metro Line 4, from either Station 420: Hyehwa Station exit 4, or Station 419: Hansung University Station (Samseon Bridge/Samseon-gyo) exit 5. Hansung University Station is the closer of the two, being only about 1.5 city blocks from the gate.

Sunday, 17 February 2013

Gwanghuimun a.k.a Namsomun

Precincts of Gwanghui-dong 1~2-ga is taken from this gate. No doubt.
Gwanghuimun (Hangul 광희문, Hanja 光熙門; also known as Southeast Gate) is one of the Eight Cardinal Gates of Seoul in the Fortress Wall of Seoul, South Korea, which surrounded the city in the Joseon Dynasty. The gate is also known as Namsomun (남소문/南小門, “South Small Gate”). It was originally called Sugumun (수구문/水口門) "Water Channel Gate."

Gwanghuimun was originally built in 1396, and was rebuilt from 1711-1719. It was largely destroyed during the Korean War (1950-1953), but was restored in 1976. The name Gwanghuimun means literally "Bright Light Gate".

Gwanghuimun is located in Gwanghui-dong 2-ga 105-3 beonji, Seoul Jung-gu, at the intersection of Geumho Avenue (Geumhoro) and Toegye Avenue (Toegyero). The current gate is located slightly further south than the original gate, due to road construction.

The gate can be easily accessed from the Dongdaemun History & Culture Park Station, which is located on Seoul Metro Lines 2 and 4 (205 and 422) and also SMRT Line 5 (Station 536). It is located about 1/2 block south from subway line 2, exit 3; and about 2 1/2 blocks east from subway line 4, exit 4. Visitors to the gate today are not allowed access under or above the gate, but can circle the gate and the section of the Fortress Wall is connected to the gate.

Souimun is Sodeongmun. Located at Seosomun-dong.

X marked on the spot. Let's go to Seosomun-dong immediately.
Souimun a.k.a Sodeongmun (Hangul/Hanja: 소의문 a.k.a 소덕문/昭義門 a.k.a 昭德門; also known as Southwest Gate) was one of the Eight Cardinal Gates of Seoul in the Fortress Wall of Seoul, South Korea, which surrounded the city in the Joseon Dynasty. The gate was also known as Seosomun (서소문/西小門, “West Small Gate”). The gate no longer exists, and there is a marker placed roughly where the gate once stood.

Souimun was originally built in 1396. It was torn down in 1914 during the Japanese colonial period (1910-1945). The names: Souimun and Sodeongmun mean literally "Promotion of Justice Gate" and "Promotion of Virtue Gate".

Today a marker exists roughly where Souimun once stood (July 2012). This marker is located next to a parking structure, which is adjacent to the JoongAng Ilbo (The JoongAng Daily) newspaper building, along Seosomun Avenue (Seosomunno), Seosomun-dong 58-10 beonji, Seoul Jung-gu.

Sodeongmun Site: Seoul's West Small Gate was built by King Taejo Yi Seong-gye of Joseon Dynasty in 1396 (5th year after King Taejo usurped the throne). It is known as the Souimun. In 1914, this gate was demolished by Japanese Colonists (4 years after annexation of Korean Empire by Japanese Empire)

The Site of Donuimun a.k.a Seodaemun

Nobuna Oda, the Six Path Demon Queen descends at Donuimun!
Donuimun (Hangul 돈의문, Hanja 敦義門; also known as West Gate) was one of the Eight Cardinal Gates of Seoul in the Fortress Wall of Seoul, South Korea, which surrounded the city in the Joseon Dynasty. The gate’s historical location is also known as Seodaemun (서대문/西大門, “West Big Gate”). The gate is located at Pyeongdong, Seoul Jongno-gu, even though it intersects with the other precincts in Seoul Jung-gu: Chungjeongno 1-ga and Jeongdong.

Donuimun was originally built in 1396. It was burned as a result of the Imjin Invasion (1592-1598) by Japan, but was rebuilt in 1711. In 1915, the gate was again destroyed during the Japanese colonial period. The gate was photographed at various times before its destruction, most notably by in a series of photographs taken by Presbyterian missionary Horace Grant Underwood in 1904. Some of these photographs show the tracks of an "American Electric Tramway" running through the gate. The name Donuimun means literally "“Loyalty Gate." It was one of the Four Great Gates (사대문) in the Fortress Wall of Seoul.

Donuimun no longer exists today (July 2012). In 2009, The Chosun Ilbo newspaper reported that the city of Seoul had announced a plan to rebuild the gate by 2013 and expand sections of the historical Fortress Wall in which it was located, but those plans have yet to be realized (July 2012). Visitors to the site of the former gate today will find a memorial in its place.

Heunginjimun a.k.a Dongdaemun

Haruna, I warn you NOT to destroy this gate! You'll make the Koreans more angry!
Heunginjimun, (Hangul/Hanja: 흥인지문/興仁之門) literally "Gate of Rising Benevolence" or more commonly known as Dongdaemun (Hangul/Hanja: 동대문/東大門), is one of the The Eight Cardinal Gates of Seoul in the Fortress Wall of Seoul, a prominent landmark in central Seoul, South Korea. The Korean name "Dongdaemun" means "Great East Gate," and it was so named because it was the major eastern gate in the wall that surrounded Seoul during the Joseon Dynasty. Please note that gate is NOT located at Dongdaemun-gu. It is located at 288 Jongno 6-ga in Seoul Jongno-gu. The structure was first built by King Taejo Yi Seong-gye during his fifth year of reign (1398). It was renovated in 1453, and the current structure is the one rebuilt in 1869.

In August 2011, the roof of the gate was partially damaged by record rainfall. The rain-inflicted damage includes chipped roof's ridge. An official of the Cultural Heritage Administration stated that "The aged gate underwent repairs in 1998 and seems to have become soaked in heavy rains".

Today, the area around Dongdaemun known as Dongdaemun Market includes upmarket shopping districts as well as several underground shops, stalls and markets that are open for much of the day and night. It has grown into the largest shopping center in South Korea. In 2007, the City of Seoul started Dongdaemun Design Project (DDP), to renovate what used to be Dongdaemun Stadium (an amateur baseball park) into Dongdaemun History and Culture Park for the preparation of World Design Capital Seoul 2010. With world-famous architect Zaha Hadid's design, when completed this structure is expected to be one of the most notable landmarks in downtown Seoul.

Heunginjimun is located at the intersection of Seoul Metro Lines 1 and 4 (128 and 421), at Dongdaemun Station (동대문역/東大門驛). The gate is within easy reach of exit 1 or exits 6-10 of this station.

Sukjeongmun a.k.a. Bukdaemun


Sukjeongmun (Hangul: 숙정문/Hanja: 肅靖門; also known as North Gate) is one of the The Eight Cardinal Gates of Seoul in the Hanyang Fortress a.k.a Fortress Wall of Seoul (Hangul: 서울 한양도성 a.k.a 서울성곽/Hanja: 서울漢陽都城 a.k.a 서울城郭), South Korea, which surrounded the city in the Joseon Dynasty. Located at Samcheong-dong san 2-1 Beonji, Seoul Jongno-gu, the gate is also known as Bukdaemun (북대문, “Northern Great Gate”).

Sukjeongmun was originally built in 1396, and was originally called Sukcheongmun (숙청문/肅淸門), but its name was modified slightly to its current name (肅靖門) in the early 16th century. Being situated so close to the Royal Palace of the Joseon Dynasty, it was rarely used for receiving visitors, and had more of a ceremonious function. The original wooden gatehouse over the gate was destroyed by fire, and the current gatehouse dates from 1976.

The name Sukjeongmun means literally “Rule Solemnly Gate.” It is one of the Four Great Gates (사대문) in the Fortress Wall of Seoul.

After the infiltration of North Korean agents during the Blue House Raid in 1968, both the gate and the surrounding area were closed off for security reasons. They were opened again for public touring by 2007. However, the area is still a highly secured area, patrolled by South Korean Army soldiers. Visiting Sukjeongmun today requires identification and issuing of a pass. Pictures of army soldiers or pictures facing south (toward the Presidential residence) are prohibited at the gate or while hiking along the northern portion of the Fortress Wall.

Monday, 4 February 2013

Guan Yu a.k.a Aisha at Dongmyo Park!

Aisha will defend the precinct of Soong-in Dong, Seoul Jongno-gu from any Northern Commie's Invasion.
My home, Dongmyo a.k.a Donggwan-wangmyo (Hanja: 東廟 or 東關王廟; which literally means "Eastern Shrine") is a shrine located at 117 Nan-gye Avenue 27th Street/NanGye-ro 27-gil, Sungin-dong 238-1 beonji, Seoul Jongno-gu built in honour of 3rd century Chinese military commander, Guan Yu a.k.a Kwan Woo in Korean; that's me.

The Joseon government embarked on construction in 1599 and completed the work in 1601. The Wanli Emperor of Ming provided funds for construction of shrine, along with plaque with his own calligraphy. Three shrines - Dongmyo (east shrine), Seomyo (서묘/西廟/west shrine) and Bungmyo (북묘/北廟/north shrine) - were actually constructed in 1601. However, only Dongmyo Shrine remains today.

There was no such practice as worshipping me as deity in Korea until Ming Dynasty military officers brought custom during military campaigns against Japan. As Neo-Confucian fundamentalists, Korean officers found it unacceptable to worship me, but were unable to refuse Chinese request for enshrinement. The construction was burden to exhausted postwar Korea and shrine was maintained only with concern for relationship with China.

Koreans remained indifferent toward these shrines for long time. But during the reign of 21st Monarch of Joseon Dynasty, King Yeongjo (1724-1776), Dongmyo and Nammyo (another shrine constructed by Ming military official Zhen Yin) were incorporated into state rituals for purpose of Ming worship linked with hostility toward and contempt for Manchu Qing Dynasty.

The shrine is surrounded by wall of stone and mud, and covers area of 9,315 m². Ceremonies held here for many years to thank me for my divine support. Shrine compound enclosed on all sides by walls. Two figures to rear of compound are general while other figures are images of retainers and other generals. Figure with red face is general's earthly countenance and one with yellow face; my spirit based on my male counterpart figure.

The shrine, following Chinese model, is narrower in width than depth, and rear and side walls are sumptuously decorated with bricks. Inside main shrine wooden image of myself is enshrined, along with statues of four of my retainers - Zhang Fei (Kor: Jang Bi), Zhao Yun (Kor: Jo Woon), Ma Chao (Kor: Ma Cho) and Huang Zhong (Kor: Hwang Chung).

A nearby station, Dongmyo Station a.k.a Dongmyo-ap (동묘앞역/東廟앞驛) on KORAIL-Seoul Metro Line 1 (Station 127) and SMRT Line 6 (Station 636) is named after my house.

Friday, 1 February 2013

Bridges in Seoul, Part VI: Seogang Bridge

Oh crap! A lunatic angeloid rampages on this bridge! Fallback!
Seogang Bridge (Hanja: 西江大橋) is a bridge over the Han River in Seoul, South Korea. The bridge links the precincts of Sinjeong-dong, Seoul Mapo-gu and Yeouido Island (Yeouido-dong), Seoul Yeongdeungpo-gu, spanning 1.32km (0.882 miles). This arched-truss type bridge is supported in the middle as it passes over the island of Bamseom West.

Initial construction began in June 7th, 1980, but work was eventually suspended in December 30th, 1996 due to environmental concerns. The bridge wasn't completed until 1999 by French construction firm, Soletanche Freyssinet. The principal boulevard for this bridge is National Assembly Boulevard (Gukhoe-daero/국회대로/國會大路) where this bridge connects to National Assembly Building to the South and Sogang University to the North.

Legend:
North Side of the Bridge
  • Exit to Gangbyeonbuk Highway (Gangbyeonbuk-ro/강변북로/江邊北路) via:
    • Yanghwa Avenue (Yanghwa-ro/양화로/楊花路) to the West.
    • Mapo Boulevard (Mapo Daero/마포로/麻浦) and Yeoui Boulevard (Yeoui Daero/여의대로/汝矣路) to the East.
    • Seogang Avenue (Seogangno/서강로/西江路), Tojeong Avenue (Tojeongno/토정로/土亭路) and Sogang University to the North.

South Side of the Bridge
  • Exit to Yeoui Western Road (Yeouiseo-ro/여의서로/汝矣西路) via:
    • Nodeul Avenue (Nodeul-ro/노들로) and Olympic Highway (Olympic Daero/올림픽대로) to the West.
    • Yeoui Boulevard (Yeoui Daero/여의대로/汝矣大路) and Yeoui Eastern Road (Yeouidongno/여의동/汝矣東) to the East.
    • National Assembly Buliding and National Assembly Library to the South.

Bridges in Seoul, Part V: Yanghwa Bridge


The Yanghwa Bridge (Hanja: 楊花大橋) is an eight lane bridge spanning the Han River in Seoul. The bridge connects the precincts of Hapjeong-dong, Seoul Mapo-gu on the north side of the river to Dangsan-dong 6-ga, Seoul Yeongdeungpo-gu on the south side of the river. The bridge is buttressed by the eastern end of the island of Seonyudo, home to Seonyudo Park (선유도공원/仙遊島公園). Its principal avenue for this bridge is Yanghwa Avenue (Yanghwa-ro/양화로/楊花路).

The bridge is a combination of two bridges: the old bridge, originally called the "Second Han River Bridge" (제2한강교), completed in 1965; and the new bridge, completed in 1982. The old bridge was the first bridge built by Korean technology after Gwangbokjeol in 1945 and served as the gateway from Seoul to the west coast. Due to increasing traffic, construction for an expansion started in 1979 and the new eight lane bridge was completed in February 1982.

The old bridge's upper structure has a width of 18.0m (59.05 feet), length 1,053m (0.654 miles) and is composed of steel plate girders and concrete box girders. The new bridge has a width of 16.1m (52.82 feet), length of 1,053m and is a steel plate girder bridge. The lower structure has an open caisson well foundation.

The bridge went through repairs and renovations in 1996 and reopened in April 2002 with additional ramps. As of February 2010, the bridge is once again going through renovations by widening the space between bridge posts to allow 5000t ships to pass. In 2011, this bridge is redesigned by adding arched truss on the center of the bridge. A Contemporary R&B song entitled "Yanghwa BRDG" was recently popularized by Zion.T in 2014.

Legend:
North Side of the Bridge
Exit to Gangbyeonbuk Highway (Gangbyeonbuk-ro/강변북로/江邊北路) via:
  • Seongsan Avenue (Seongsanno/성산로/城山路) to the West.
  • Seogang Avenue (Seogangno/서강로/西江路) and National Assembly Boulevard (Gukhoe-daero/국회대로/國會大路) to the East.
  • Hongik University Seoul Campus to the North.


South Side of the Bridge
Exit to Olympic Highway (Olympic Daero/올림픽대로) via:
  • Nodeul Avenue (Nodeul-ro/노들로) and Seoul West Arterial Road (Seobu Ganseondoro/서부간선도로 /西部幹線道路) to the West.
  • Yeoui West Avenue (Yeouiseo-ro/여의서로/汝矣西路) and National Assembly Boulevard (Gukhoe-daero/국회대로/國會大路) to the East.
  • Seonyu Avenue (Seonyu-ro/선유로/仙遊路) to the South.



This song soothes your ears. This is Zion.T with his song, Yanghwa BRDG.



Bridges in Seoul, Part IV: Seongsan Bridge

Megumi: What are you looking at, mate? Do you love this bridge? I'm sure that you're love it.

The Seongsan Bridge (Hanja: 城山大橋) crosses the Han River in South Korea and connects the precincts of Mangwon-dong, Seoul Mapo-gu and Yangpyeong-dong, Seoul Yeongdeungpo-gu with the span of 1.41km (0.876 miles). Construction began in April 1977 and was completed on June 30, 1980.

Its principal avenue of this bridge is Seongsan Avenue (Seongsanno/성산로/城山路) and a part of National Route 1. Seongsan Bridge is the 12th bridge to span Korea's Han River.

Legend:
North Side of the Bridge
  • Exit to Gangbyeonbuk Highway (Gangbyeonbuk-ro/강변북로/江邊北路) via:
    • Nanji Han River Park, World Cup Park to the West.
    • Yanghwa Avenue (Yanghwa-ro/양화로/楊花路) to the East.
    • Seoul Inner Ringway (Naebu Sunhwandoro/내부순환/內部循環路) and Seoul Mapo-gu Office to the North.

South Side of the Bridge
  • Exit to Olympic Highway (Olympic Daero/올림픽대로) via:
    • Hwagok Avenue (Hwagok-ro/화곡로/禾谷路) to the West.
    • Yanghwa Avenue (Yanghwa-ro/양화로/楊花路) to the East.
    • Nodeul Avenue (Nodeul-ro/노들로) and Seoul West Arterial Road (Seobu Ganseondoro/서부간선도로 /西部幹線道路) to the South.

Bridges in Seoul, Part III: Gayang Bridge

Fuuko looks like the Han River Maiden.
The Gayang Bridge (Hanja: 加陽大橋) crosses the Han River in South Korea and connects the precincts of Gayang-dong, Seoul Gangseo-gu and SangAm-dong, Seoul Mapo-gu with the span of 2.5km (1.55 miles). The bridge was built in December 1994 and completed in May 31st 2002. Its principal avenue of this bridge is Hwagok Avenue (Hwagok-ro/화곡로/禾谷路).


Legend:
North Side of the Bridge
Exit to Gangbyeonbuk Highway (Gangbyeonbuk-ro/강변북로/江邊北路) via:
  • I-130: Seoul Ring Expressway (EXIT 8: Bungno JCT/북로분기점/北路分岐點) to the West.
  • Nanji Han River Park, World Cup Park to the East.
  • Deogeun Avenue (DeogEun-ro/덕은로) and Seoul Sang-am World Cup Stadium to the North.

South Side of the Bridge
Exit to Olympic Highway (Olympic Daero/올림픽대로) via:
  • Gangseo Avenue (Gangseo-ro/강서로/江西路) to the West.
  • Yeouido-dong, Yeongdeungpo-gu to the East.
  • Heo Jun Avenue (Heo Jun-ro/허준로/許浚路) to the South.